The Western Georges

By Christopher Bretz

 

This is a work in progress.

Orville George and Diana Neilson's daughters.

 

Bobbi George

Roberta 'Bobbi' George (1944- ) was born in Oxford, England on January 25th, 1944 to Orville George and Diana Neilson. Her mother was so sure that she was having a boy she had picked out the name Bobby months previously. She was very surprised when she bore a girl, but decided the name would still work, with a few adjustments.

She came to Canada with her mother in 1946 at age 2 years, 8 months. They sailed from Liverpool on September 2nd aboard the S.S. Letitia the and arrived in Halifax about 10 days later. They then took the train across country to Winnipeg and arrived on September 14th where her father was there to meet them. They stayed a night in the St. Regis Hotel then headed out to Neepawa. Poor Bobbi was sea-sick and train sick the entire journey.

The family lived in a small two room house with a dirt floor, little more than a shack really, that her father had quickly built after his return from the war.

Bobbi's twin sisters were born in July 1947.

The family soon moved into a larger home, also built by her father on the same lot, when Bobbi was around 4 years old. It had two bedrooms and an open area living/dining room, with floors and a concrete basement. There was no plumbing, however, so the family continued to use an outhouse and bedpans for some years. There was a coal chute for furnace heating and an area for storing garden vegetables in basement. The family had a wood burning stove stove until the mid 50s.

When the children started going to school at age 6 they caught all the childhood diseases - chicken pox, measles and mumps (except Judy). Every summer all three sisters would get the German measles. When they were sick they insisted on sleeping with their mother so they all would move out to the couch, which was made into a bed.

One of the few regiment buddies Bobbi's father kept in touch with was Ernie Gallant. During the late 1950s they would get together to visit, but not really to reminisce. During one of these visits they both started smoking after having quit for some time, and Orville never looked back. Ernie was also Bobbi's godfather.

Bobbi attended school in Neepawa at West Park Elementary through grade 8, then onto NACI (Neepawa Area Collegiate Institute) for Grade 9 – it was a brand new school at that time.

The family were members of St. James Anglican Church, where the girls attended Sunday school and sang in the choir.

The George family kept a very large garden from which they got the majority of their food. They grew potatoes, corn, beans, carrots, peas, rhubarb, and more. They didn't eat a lot of meat, but regularly ate eggs for dinner. Occasionally there would be treats like fruit on special occasions, such as oranges at Christmas. The whole family did their share of work tending the garden.

The sisters knew their grandpa Arthur George quite well and they loved him very much. He lived in Neepawa a few streets over from them until the early 50s and would visit them often. They remember him as a big storyteller, and were always wary of his handshake, where he would squeeze the children's hands extra hard. He later moved away to Swift Current, but would still come back to visit often.

The sisters only knew their Neilson grandparents through stories, Christmas presents, and photos. Mu and Danda, as they were known lived in England on the Isle of Wight and never were able to visit Canada. They died when the children were young. Their uncle Bill Neilson would send Christmas gifts but they saw him rarely.

The family knew their father's uncles and aunts families much better and spent a great deal of time visiting with cousins, especially Russel's and Gladys' children.

Bobbi's father got full time work with the Neepawa airport around 1953-55, providing the family with more income and stability.

In 1953 Bobbi's father bought his first car and took the family to visit the big city for the first time. They drove to Winnipeg and stayed at St. Regis Hotel for a few days. They hadn't seen buildings so tall before. This trip was also the first time the family ate in a restaurant.

The George family bought its first television in 1955, and they were only the second ones on their street to get one. It was hugely exciting for all. Before that the children used to watch Roy Rogers on the neighbors set. Programs would only be broadcast in the evenings but the family loved to shows such as Ed Sullivan, Yogi Bear, and Dinah Shore. They also watched NHL hockey every Saturday night.

The George family had a number of pets growing up. There were several cats, including Bucky and Snooki. Bucky was the first, but as a kitten he was lost and greatly upset the sisters. They got another cat they called Snooki. She was much loved and would capture birds and mice and drop them on Judy's bed, half alive as a gift. Snooki had kittens one year and the event had a lasting impact on the girls. One day Bucky returned after a year and a half and made himself at home, now a very large cat. Unfortunately Snooki and Bucky did not get along and Bucky was given away. The family was forced to give Snooki away when they moved to Winnipeg, as their father said it wouldn't be fair to her in the city.

The girl's mother also kept a number of budgie birds as pets they called Pat, Judy, Joey, and Petey. Often the birds were allowed to fly freely around the house. Once a bird escaped from the house by sitting on Bobbi's head. The family put an ad in local paper letting people know it was out there and incredibly it was found by fellow, bird-loving neighbor only a few miles away.

Bobbi also had a white lab rat named Jimmy she kept from a school experiment. Jimmy was the subject of a dietary test where all he got to eat was potato chips, representing the 'poor diet' group.

Bobbi was often saddled with looking after the twins by their mother, and she didn't like it very much. Truthfully, they didn't want to tag along with Bobbi either and would have been quite happy to play on their own. Years later the sisters talked and realized none of them wanted that situation, and that it was just their mother's way of getting time to herself.

Bobbie was involved with a dance band as their singer at school and took singing lessons for two years. She also played basketball once she got to high school. Her mother would go down to all their home games.

In 1956 Bobbi's father finally put a bathroom in to the family home. before that was outhouse (if too cold there was one in the basement). and turned the attic into two bedrooms for his daughters. Their old bedroom become the stairway and the bathroom. before plumbing they had galvanized steel bathtub and on sat night they would heat water on the stove and take turns bathing. father last.

Met Dick Prawdzik in high school around 1960

Bobbi's father took a job with the Winnipeg airport in 1960 and he told the family they would have to leave Neepawa.

Bobbi moved to Winnipeg with her family in December 1961 to a house on Bannerman Ave in the north end.  It was a very large house with lots of rooms, but it was so dirty it took all five of them over a day to wash the floors and get the furniture moved into the right rooms. After having Christmas dinner Bobbie took the bus out to Eden to stay with Dick and his parents for the Xmas holidays.

The novelty of the big city wore off quickly and the children and their mother were soon all miserable in a big city in the middle of winter. Every chance they got all three girls would take the bus to Neepawa and stay with friends when they had a few days holidays. They initially hated Winnipeg, their teachers and the fellow children.

In May 1962 Bobbi's mother started to foster orphaned babies, something she loved and would do for the next ten years. Laurie, the girl's baby sister, was adopted by their parents in 1964.

Bobbi graduated in 1962

Married Dick Prawdzik, a high school science teacher in 1966. Moved to Hamiota and bought a small farm, where they have stayed for many years.

Had 3 kids together. Cindy, Michael and Kristen.

Sister's CMT

Bobbi's father Orville died after a fight with cancer in 1984.

In the summer of 1985 the George family held a large family reunion in Neepawa.

Bobbie's mother died in 2000.

Her whole life, Bobbi assumed that her parents has properly naturalized her as a Canadian, but when she went to get her first Passport for a trip to Cuba, she discovered much to her surprise that she was technically still a citizen of the United Kingdom. She didn't get her Canadian citizenship officially until 2004, at age 60.

Bobbi and Dick travel a fair bit to visit with their children and grandchildren between Whitehorse, Calgary, and Pilot Mound.

 

Children

Cindy Prawdzik married Larry Bridges and they had 4 children together. They live in Pilot Mound, Manitoba.

Michael Prawdzik married Jane Wilson and they had 2 children together. They are both teachers and live in Whitehorse, Yukon.

Kristie Prawdzik married Shane Kinghorn and they had 2 children together. They live in Calgary, Alberta.

 

 

Jenny George

Jennifer Verla George (1947- ) was born in Neepawa, Manitoba on July 22nd, 1947 to Orville George and Diana Neilson. She was the identical twin sister of Judy, and born just a few minutes before her (by C section). She was named for her aunt, Verla George.

Her first home was a small two room house with a dirt floor, little more than a shack really, that her father had quickly built after his return from the war.

The family soon moved into a larger home, also built by her father on the same lot, when Jennie was around a year old. It had two bedrooms and an open area living/dining room, with floors and a concrete basement. There was no plumbing, however, so the family continued to use an outhouse and bedpans for some years. There was a coal chute for furnace heating and an area for storing garden vegetables in basement. The family had a wood burning stove stove until the mid 50s.

Jennie and her sister Judy were inseparable from a young age, sleeping together and walking around holding hands. The were dressed alike out of practicality, and many people often confused one for the other.

When the twins were little they would wander away from the house into town, so their father built a fence with a gate so they couldn't stray far. One day before the gate was up they had taken off and their worried mother found them walking hand in hand into downtown Neepawa.

When the children started going to school at age 6 they caught all the childhood diseases - chicken pox, measles and mumps (except Judy). Every summer all three sisters would get the German measles. When they were sick they insisted on sleeping with their mother so they all would move out to the couch, which was made into a bed.

Jennie attended school in Neepawa at West Park Elementary, then Viscount Junior High for grades 7-8, then Neepawa Area Colligate Institute for grade 9.

The family were members of St. James Anglican Church, where the girls attended Sunday school and sang in the choir.

The George family kept a very large garden from which they got the majority of their food. They grew potatoes, corn, beans, carrots, peas, rhubarb, and more. They didn't eat a lot of meat, but regularly ate eggs for dinner. Occasionally there would be treats like fruit on special occasions, such as oranges at Christmas. The whole family did their share of work tending the garden.

The sisters knew their grandpa Arthur George quite well and they loved him very much. He lived in Neepawa a few streets over from them until the early 50s and would visit them often. They remember him as a big storyteller, and were always wary of his handshake, where he would squeeze the children's hands extra hard. He later moved away to Swift Current, but would still come back to visit often.

The sisters only knew their Neilson grandparents through stories, Christmas presents, and photos. Mu and Danda, as they were known lived in England on the Isle of Wight and never were able to visit Canada. They died when the children were young. Their uncle Bill Neilson would send Christmas gifts but they saw him rarely.

The family knew their father's uncles and aunts families much better and spent a great deal of time visiting with cousins, especially Russel's and Gladys' children.

One time, when the twins were still quite young, their father took them on a train ride to Birnie. Although the town is not very far from Neepawa, it was the milk run, literally gathering dairy from the farms along the way, making for a longer journey. The sisters remembered it as wonderful experience where they visited with aunts Gladys, Muriel, and Luella at the end.

In 1953 Jennie's father bought his first car and took the family to visit the big city for the first time. They drove to Winnipeg and stayed at St. Regis Hotel for a few days. They hadn't seen buildings so tall before. At one point the family was in the Eaton's department store and, as was their habit, the twins wandered off wanting to return to the hotel on their own. They thought all store only had one door and one set of stairs and really had no idea where they were. Fortunately a mindful doorman stopped them before they left the store, and returned them to their worried parents. This trip was also the first time the family ate in a restaurant.

Jennie and her sister would spend a lot of time in the park at the end of the street in the summertime, swimming and playing around the White Mud river. There were also marching bands and an outdoor movie theatre where National Film Board films were shown. They also played Cowboys and Indians and baseball with the neighbors kids.

The George family bought its first television in 1955, and they were only the second ones on their street to get one. It was hugely exciting for all. Before that the children used to watch Roy Rogers on the neighbors set. Programs would only be broadcast in the evenings but the family loved to shows such as Ed Sullivan, Yogi Bear, and Dinah Shore. They also watched NHL hockey every Saturday night.

In 1956 Jennie's father finally was able to put a bathroom in the family home. In the process he also turned the attic into two bedrooms for his growing daughters. Their old bedroom become the new stairway and bathroom. Judy and Jennie still shared a bedroom, and Bobbi had her own room. Before the house had plumbing the Georges had a galvanized steel bathtub which on Saturday nights would be filled with water from the stove in order for the family to take turns bathing. Their father was always last.

The George family had a number of pets growing up. There were several cats, including Bucky and Snooki. Bucky was the first, but as a kitten he was lost and it greatly upset the sisters. They got another cat they called Snooki. She was much loved and would capture birds and mice and drop them on Judy's bed, half alive as a gift. Snooki had kittens one year and the event had a lasting impact on the girls. One day Bucky returned after a year and a half and made himself at home, now a very large cat. Unfortunately Snooki and Bucky did not get along and Bucky was given away. The family was forced to give Snooki away when they moved to Winnipeg, as their father said it wouldn't be fair to her in the city.

The girl's mother also kept a number of budgie birds as pets they called Pat, Judy, Joey, and Petey. Often the birds were allowed to fly freely around the house. Once a bird escaped from the house by sitting on Bobbi's head. The family put an ad in local paper letting people know it was out there and incredibly it was found by fellow, bird-loving neighbor only a few miles away.

Bobbi also had a white lab rat named Jimmy she kept from a school experiment. Jimmy was the subject of a dietary test where all he got to eat was potato chips, representing the 'poor diet' group.

Jen's father took a job with the Winnipeg airport in 1960 and he told the family they would have to leave Neepawa.

Jen moved to Winnipeg with her family in December 1961 to a house on Bannerman Ave in the north end.  It was a very large house with lots of rooms, but it was so dirty it took all five of them over a day to wash the floors and get the furniture moved into the right rooms. This was the first time all of the George daughters had their own beds and rooms.

The novelty of the big city wore off quickly and the children and their mother were soon all miserable in a big city in the middle of winter. Every chance they got all three girls would take the bus to Neepawa and stay with friends when they had a few days holidays. They initially hated Winnipeg, their teachers and the fellow children.

While Jennie and Judy were at Luxton they shared classes with a young Burton Cummings, who would as an adult go on to head the rock band The Guess Who. Burton was the one who first introduced the twins and their friends to the music of a new group called the Beatles. Even decades later he still remembered the George twins when they were reunited at a High School Reunion in 2010.

In May 1962 Jennie's mother started to foster orphaned babies, something she loved and would do for the next ten years. Laurie, the girl's baby sister, was adopted by their parents in 1964.

After a regular visit to the doctor, the twins were sent to an orthopedic surgeon on account of their misshapen feet. They thought it was on account of a deformity and so the girls underwent two years of operations on their feet through 1963-64.

In 1963 Jennie's knee would not stay in place and she had to have surgery on it.

Graduated high school in 1965.

Was in the Navy for a few months. age 19. discharged because of feet in basic.

In 1966 Judy and Jennie were finally diagnosed as having a neurological disease by Dr. Ross. He called it Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease but the sister's didn't find this out until years later, as their mother kept it from them seeking to protect them. It was only later in Edmonton in 1980 that Dr. Warren did a genetic test which clearly diagnosed CMT disease for Judy. Jennie and Bobbi soon had testing as well and it was found that Jennie was positive and Bobbi negative. They were initially upset, but upon reflection realized it helped explain a number of things about their lives and bodies growing up. As the disease can only can be passed on if you have the mutation, none of Bobbi's children inherited it, and it was a 50/50 chance that any of Judy and Jennie's children would have it.

Married Angus McLean in 1968, but divorced several years later.

Met Terry McDowell

Married Terry McDowell in 1972. Moved to Transcona where they have lived for many years.

Had 2 kids Tim and Shaun.

Jenny's father Orville died after a fight with cancer in 1984.

In the summer of 1985 the George family held a large family reunion in Neepawa.

Worked in bank for many years.

Jenny's mother died in 2000.

The family had several dogs over the years including Chocolate, Tika, and Angel.

Children and grandchildren live not too far from them

She still talks to her twin sister every day.

 

Children

Tim McDowell married Dodie Rawluk and they had 2 children together. They live in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Shaun McDowell married Stephanie Tysoski and they had 2 children together. They live in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

 

 

Judy George

Judith Velma George (1947- ) was born in Neepawa, Manitoba on July 22nd, 1947 to Orville George and Diana Neilson. She was the identical twin sister of Jennifer, and born just a few minutes after her (by C section). She was named for her aunt, Velma George.

Her first home was a small two room house with a dirt floor, little more than a shack really, that her father had quickly built after his return from the war.

The family soon moved into a larger home, also built by her father on the same lot, when Judy was around a year old. It had two bedrooms and an open area living/dining room, with floors and a concrete basement. There was no plumbing, however, so the family continued to use an outhouse and bedpans for some years. There was a coal chute for furnace heating and an area for storing garden vegetables in basement. The family had a wood burning stove stove until the mid 50s.

Judy and her sister Jennie were inseparable from a young age, sleeping together and walking around holding hands. They were dressed alike out of practicality, and many people often confused one for the other.

When the twins were little they would wander away from the house into town, so their father built a fence with a gate so they couldn't stray far. One day before the gate was up they had taken off and their worried mother found them walking hand in hand into downtown Neepawa.

When Judy and Jennie were about 16 months old they were playing in the back yard walking along a ladder which was lying on the ground. Suddenly Judy started screaming so her mother picked her up and took her in the house. Judy lay on the couch and cried for about 3 hours. When her father came home he decided to get the doctor, who told them she had a broken collar bone.

Judy had rheumatic fever at age 2.

When the children started going to school at age 6 they caught all the childhood diseases - chicken pox, measles and mumps (except Judy). Every summer all three sisters would get the German measles. When they were sick they insisted on sleeping with their mother so they all would move out to the couch, which was made into a bed.

Judy attended school in Neepawa at West Park Elementary, then Viscount Junior High for grades 7-8, then Neepawa Area Colligate Institute for grade 9.

The family were members of St. James Anglican Church, where the girls attended Sunday school and sang in the choir.

The George family kept a very large garden from which they got the majority of their food. They grew potatoes, corn, beans, carrots, peas, rhubarb, and more. They didn't eat a lot of meat, but regularly ate eggs for dinner. Occasionally there would be treats like fruit on special occasions, such as oranges at Christmas. The whole family did their share of work tending the garden.

In those days it was more common for people to eat large meals at lunch instead of dinner.

The sisters knew their grandpa Arthur George quite well and they loved him very much. He lived in Neepawa a few streets over from them until the early 50s and would visit them often. They remember him as a big storyteller, and were always wary of his handshake, where he would squeeze the children's hands extra hard. He later moved away to Swift Current, but would still come back to visit often. Judy especially remembered him buying her a charm bracelet at Clear Lake one year.

The sisters only knew their Neilson grandparents through stories, Christmas presents, and photos. Mu and Danda, as they were known lived in England on the Isle of Wight and never were able to visit Canada. They died when the children were young. Their uncle Bill Neilson would send Christmas gifts but they saw him rarely.

The family knew their father's uncles and aunts families much better and spent a great deal of time visiting with cousins, especially Russel's and Gladys' children.

One time, when the twins were still quite young, their father took them on a train ride to Birnie. Although the town is not very far from Neepawa, it was the milk run, literally gathering dairy from the farms along the way, making for a longer journey. The sisters remembered it as wonderful experience where they visited with aunts Gladys, Muriel, and Luella at the end.

In 1953 Judy's father bought his first car and took the family to visit the big city for the first time. They drove to Winnipeg and stayed at St. Regis Hotel for a few days. They hadn't seen buildings so tall before. At one point the family was in the Eaton's department store and, as was their habit, the twins wandered off wanting to return to the hotel on their own. They thought all store only had one door and one set of stairs and really had no idea where they were. Fortunately a mindful doorman stopped them before they left the store, and returned them to their worried parents. This trip was also the first time the family ate in a restaurant.

At school one day when Judy was 6, she was playing soccer and got tackled and was hurt. Her teacher got sister Bobbi to take Judy to the hospital and found she had broken her collarbone in the same place as when she was a baby. There was never a dull moment in these days as the girls were always jumping over something and getting their knees out of joint and then would have to get the doctor. Their mother honestly just thought they were clumsy.

Judy and her sister would spend a lot of time in the park at the end of the street in the summertime, swimming and playing around the White Mud river. There were also marching bands and an outdoor movie theatre where National Film Board films were shown. They also played Cowboys and Indians and baseball with the neighbors kids.

The family sold carnations at Mother's day and poppies at Remembrance day.

The twins knew that their older sister Bobbi was often saddled with them by their mother, and knew she didn't like it very much. Truthfully, they didn't want to tag along with Bobbi either and would have been quite happy to play on their own. Years later the sisters talked and realized none of them wanted that situation, and that it was just their mother's way of getting time to herself.

The sisters really enjoyed winter and spent a lot of time in the snow. They tobogganed all day and would run home to warm themselves by the oven. Their mother would often help them build snow forts.

Judy's father got full time work with the Neepawa airport around 1953-55, providing the family with more income and stability.

At 8 years of age Judy's knee went out for first time and swelled up quite large. She and her sister knew they were different - unathletic and clumsy - but they were not sure why their bodies were seemingly more frail than the other kids. They were often made to feel bad by gym teachers as inferior.

The George family bought its first television in 1955, and they were only the second ones on their street to get one. It was hugely exciting for all. Before that the children used to watch Roy Rogers on the neighbors set. Programs would only be broadcast in the evenings but the family loved to shows such as Ed Sullivan, Yogi Bear, and Dinah Shore. They also watched NHL hockey every Saturday night.

In 1956 Judy's father finally was able to put a bathroom in the family home. In the process he also turned the attic into two bedrooms for his growing daughters. Their old bedroom become the new stairway and bathroom. Judy and Jennie still shared a bedroom, and Bobbi had her own room. Before the house had plumbing the Georges had a galvanized steel bathtub which on Saturday nights would be filled with water from the stove in order for the family to take turns bathing. Their father was always last.

The George family had a number of pets growing up. There were several cats, including Bucky and Snooki. Bucky was the first, but as a kitten he was lost and it greatly upset the sisters. They got another cat they called Snooki. She was much loved and would capture birds and mice and drop them on Judy's bed, half alive as a gift. Snooki had kittens one year and the event had a lasting impact on the girls. One day Bucky returned after a year and a half and made himself at home, now a very large cat. Unfortunately Snooki and Bucky did not get along and Bucky was given away. The family was forced to give Snooki away when they moved to Winnipeg, as their father said it wouldn't be fair to her in the city.

The girl's mother also kept a number of budgie birds as pets they called Pat, Judy, Joey, and Petey. Often the birds were allowed to fly freely around the house. Once a bird escaped from the house by sitting on Bobbi's head. The family put an ad in local paper letting people know it was out there and incredibly it was found by fellow, bird-loving neighbor only a few miles away.

Bobbi also had a white lab rat named Jimmy she kept from a school experiment. Jimmy was the subject of a dietary test where all he got to eat was potato chips, representing the 'poor diet' group.

In the summers the George family tent camped for weeks at a time up at Riding Mountain Park and Clear Lake. Also at Lynch's Point, where one time the family arrived shortly after a twister had just gone through and they were surprised at the destruction it caused.

In December 1960 Judy's father was sent up to Southampton Island in the N.W.T. for a year. In April he broke his foot so was sent home for several weeks.

Judy's father took a job with the Winnipeg airport in 1960 and he told the family they would have to leave Neepawa.

Judy moved to Winnipeg with her family in December 1961 to a house on Bannerman Ave in the north end.  It was a very large house with lots of rooms, but it was so dirty it took all five of them over a day to wash the floors and get the furniture moved into the right rooms. This was the first time all of the George daughters had their own beds and rooms.

The novelty of the big city wore off quickly and the children and their mother were soon all miserable in a big city in the middle of winter. Every chance they got all three girls would take the bus to Neepawa and stay with friends when they had a few days holidays. They initially hated Winnipeg, their teachers and the fellow children.

Started to regularly attend church at St John's Cathedral. Judy and Jennie had their Confirmation there in 1962.

In May 1962 Judy's mother started to foster orphaned infants, something she loved and would do for the next ten years. Laurie, her baby sister, was adopted by their parents in 1964.

After a regular visit to the doctor, the twins were sent to an orthopedic surgeon on account of their misshapen feet, which had grown increasingly problematic. It was thought they had a type of deformity and so the girls underwent two years of operations on their feet during 1963-64.

Judy and Jennie attended Luxton Junior High School, then St. John's High School.

While Judy and Jennie were at Luxton they shared classes with a young Burton Cummings, who would as an adult go on to head the rock band The Guess Who. Judy first heard him play piano at a party they were both at and she was amazed at his skill. She remembered borrowing his history notes when she first attended Luxton, as they had transferred in halfway through the school year. She always thought of him as the nicest guy. Burton was the one who first introduced the twins and their friends to the music of a new group called the Beatles. Even decades later he still remembered the George twins when they were reunited at a High School Reunion in 2010.

In 1963 brothers Dennis and Allan Nagy took Judy and Jennie up in small four seater plane and gave them their first experience flying. The both loved it. Judy and Allan dated on and off for several years.

Judy graduated from high school in 1965.

In 1966 Judy and Jennie were finally diagnosed as having a neurological disease by Dr. Ross. It was called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease but the sister's didn't find this out until many years later, as their mother kept the news from them seeking to protect them, and not dissuade them from having children. It was only later, in Edmonton in 1980, that Dr. Warren did a genetic test which clearly diagnosed CMT disease for Judy. Jennie and Bobbi soon had tests as well and it was found that Jennie was positive and Bobbi negative for CMT. They were initially upset, but upon reflection realized it helped explain a number of things about their lives and bodies growing up. As the disease can only can be passed on if you have the mutation, none of Bobbi's children inherited it, and it was a 50/50 chance that any of Judy and Jennie's children would have it. Some did, some did not.

Judy met David Bretz through a friend on a blind date in November 1965. He was just 21, and she 18 year old. They went downtown to a Laurel and Hardy movie and ate at A&W afterward. Judy didn't like the film it but didn't tell David that right away, as she enjoyed his company. After a second date with him she went home and said to her sister, "I will marry that man", so sure she was in him.

Judy was studying in the radiography program at Miseracordia Hospital at that time. She later left the program because of her feet not being to cope with standing so much all day. Later she worked for Beaver Lumber in the back office, and then for Manitoba Medical in the claims department.

Older sister Bobbi was married in 1966.

David proposed to Judy in 1967.

Several bridal showers and a series of other dinners and events were held for Judy and Dave in the week leading up to their marriage. 

David and Judy were married on September 14th, 1968 at a wedding in St. John's Anglican Cathedral in Winnipeg.

Had 3 kids. Christopher, Jeffrey, and Andrew.

She still talks to her twin sister every day.

For more on Judy's family see the Western Bretzes II.

 

Children

Christopher is unmarried an lives in Toronto, Ontario.

Jeff married Whitney Horwath and they had 2 children together. Jeff also had 2 children from earlier relationships. They all live in Calgary, Alberta.

Andrew married Cindy McMann. They live in Guelph, Ontario.

 

 

Laurie George

Laurie Diana George (1964- ) was born February 9th, 1964. She was adopted by Orville and Diana later that year.

Raised in Winnipeg

Laurie's father Orville died after a fight with cancer in 1984.

In the summer of 1985 the George family held a large family reunion in Neepawa.

Moved to Banff 1980s

Moved to Calgary.

Laurie's mother died in 2000.

 

A selection of Orville's favorite songs.

We’ll Meet Again Vera Lynn
It’s a Long Way to Tipperary  
The Old Rugged Cross Johnny Cash
Red River Valley Marty Robbins
Dont Fence Me In Bing Crosby
   
  Woody Guthrie
   
   

A selection of Diana's favorite songs.

Bridge Over Troubled Water Simon and Garfunkel
Diana Paul Anka
  Elvis
Opera